Sunday, January 31, 2016

Pronunciation Reminder

When Speaking




RULE: When a “borrowed” language word is used, the final syllable will always be one of the -i- syllables from the 3rd column (e.g. suffixes of -Ꭲ, -Ꭹ, -Ꭿ, -Ꮅ, -Ꮋ, -Ꮒ, -Ꮘ, -Ꮟ, -Ꮧ, -Ꮨ, -Ꮯ, -Ꮵ, -Ꮻ, -Ᏹ ) of the Syllabary Chart as arranged by Worcester, and will always have a rising upward or high tonal sound/pitch.


[Source: Anna Gritts Kilpatrick Smith; Cherokee EBCI Elder Walker Calhoun]

When speaking or when writing:


Adding the final suffix of "-Ꭲ" to a common noun such as the name of a color or a number indicates that the speaker wants the listener to understand this is not the generic name of the item but is a specific item in proximity to the speaker that s/he wants us to recognize.

It also differentiates the name of a common noun to that of a proper noun, such as when a person is named "RED". 

For example, the color red is simply ᎩᎦᎨ, but to call a person RED would be to say ᎩᎦᎨᎢ.


The same is true with numbers and many other common nouns.


SOURCE:  Anna Gritts Kilpatrick Smith; Cherokee EBCI Elder Walker Calhoun, Harry Oosahwee

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Respecting your Elders where it counts

In the winter months, when temperatures plummet, we are reminded to care for our elders.


But we shouldn't just check in on them when the weather is bad.


We need to truly respect and honor them.


The question rises from time to time:  how do we do that correctly?


Years ago, when I first began meeting regularly with a few elders for the purpose of practicing speaking, I was confounded by a such a quandary.




The elder obviously was spending a great deal of time with me and helping me, but how could I repay them? 


They would not tell me what they would appreciate, but I knew that just giving groceries and gifts was not adequate reimbursement for their time.




So I spoke with lots of folks and came up with a plan that the elders (seemed to) appreciate and that I could live with myself.




I continued to give gifts of course, purchasing groceries and household supplies, items I knew they could use in their craft making, and even making gifts for them myself using my own skills.


But I also checked around and found out what tutors and piano teachers were charging in our area.


I took the high and the low charges and averaged them out.  I kept track of the hours of direct contact the elder would spend with me.




I then would put this in an envelope and would give it to the elder when I dropped off my usual gifts.


Folks, this was a practical solution and I never had an elder turn this down. 


You can of course, offer those who are teaching you your language more than this, but I found this "rule of thumb" helpful in keeping me accountable and on track with my lessons.


It was also something I could calculate into my household budget.




If you are interested in developing your own average to share with an elder, check out this blog on piano lesson costs per each half hour around the country:  http://takelessons.com/blog/how-much-are-piano-lessons




You can also check your local newspaper and colleges and find out what tutors and music teachers charge in your community.




Respecting your elders seems rather vague but putting it into this context helps to understand what is a fair and equitable way to care for those who are giving you this precious gift.




Remember, this is a starting point;  you should also give as much as you can to help your elder by sharing items where appropriate (in addition to giving money) such as firewood, groceries, yard work, household items, clothing and other ways of showing your love and gratitude.


Don't just wait for your elder's birthday or Christmas either, but of course, you should also give something on those occasions.




Our elders would never ask this from us, but they would have every right to demand it.  If we truly want to honor our elders, we must be willing to do more than just say nice things about them and "thank you" without anything to back it up is just a nice sounding phrase to soothe our own conscience but it does nothing to help our elders, many of whom are on a very small fixed income.


SGI for listening!

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Intro to Conjunctions

An introduction to Cherokee Conjunctions
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, sentences, phrases, or clauses found in the English [Yigilisi] language.


This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for different languages.


In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction.


The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that".

Here is a list of
Cherokee Conjunctions
and their English  [Yigilisi]


Counterparts that you may find helpful:

And / &


ᎠᎴ / ᏃᎴ

ᎠᎴ (western dialect)
-----
ᏃᎴ
 (eastern dialect)
====
but/yet
ᎠᏎᏃ
====
For
ᎾᏍᎩ
=====
Nor/ or
ᏙᎨ (prounced with hard "g" sound approaching "k"
(a negative is found elsewhere in the sentence in the case of "nor")
====
So
ᎾᏍᏉᎴ


NOTE:  while some may use these differently, the 3 elders I discussed this with all affirmed that this is the more correct/ more precise way of using these conjunctions.

PURPLE- different names for PURPLE

I tore a muscle in my arm a few months ago and while its healing I have to rest it.
I found someone to help me post this. 
Once I am better, I will post more often.


Voice recognition programs do not seem to work with Cherokee language ... yet...


PURPLE-- different names for PURPLE




why different words?

has more to do with than just the HUE it also relates to the kind

ᏕᎷᎨᎢ de-lu-ge-i
purple colored flowers such as the thistle [ ᏥᏥ ]blossom


or

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ u-we-ti-ge-i

 purple colored plants; describes edible vegetables like purple onions and purple potatoes BUT also describes inedible mushrooms

purple topped mushrooms
purple potatoes


ᏕᎷᎨᎢ purple colored flowers are transitory items;

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ purple colored plants means the item itself is saturated with that color- the stems, stalks, tubers and even the fruit.

Purple Cabbage



SENTENCES TO STUDY

"The Cherokee did NOT eat the purple mushroom"

ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏍᏗᏱ ᏓᏂᏯᎩᏍᎨ ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ ᏓᏬᎵ

======


"Plants purple they are blooming"



ᏕᎦᎪᏗ ᏕᎷᎨᎢ ᎠᏂᏥᎸᏍᎦ

========

"Scottish Thistle has a purple blossom"

ᎠᏍᎦᏥ ᏥᏥ ᎤᏰᎬᎢ ᏕᎷᎨᎢ ᎤᏥᎸᎰᎢ

=======

"s/he used a purple onion in her/his cooking"

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ ᏒᎩ ᎬᏗ ᏍᎬᎩ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬᎢ

===




NOTE: ᏕᎷᎨᎢ is also used to describe bruises because they are transitory; ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ is used for age spots because they become permanent; this also has overtones/nuances of age, maturity and fruition.



Tuesday, October 20, 2015

afraid part 1

ᎯᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ / hi-s-ga-i-he-s-di (you) Be afraid! (Imperative, singular, first person bound pronoun)


ᏥᏍᎦᎢᎭ /tsi-s-ga-i-ha/ I am afraid (present tense, singular, first person bound pronoun)


ᏥᏍᎦᎢᎲᎩ /tsi-s-ga-i-hv-gi/ I was afraid (singular, first person bound pronoun, past tense)


Don't be Afraid! (imperative, singular, first person bound pronoun) ᎨᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ/gesdi yisgaihesdi/




extra:  singular, imperative, western dialect:  ᏞᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /Tle-s-di yi-s-ga-i-he-s-di/


extra:  (don't be afraid, plural)
one of the plural forms would be:

Eastern: ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᏗᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /gesesdi yisdisgaihesdi/

Western:
ᏞᏍᏗ ᏂᎯ ᏱᏍᏗᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /Tle-s-di ni-hi yi-s-di-s-ga-i-he-s-di/

Friday, October 16, 2015

Moms & Dads

you asked for more---- hia--




you asked for

ᎯᎠ ᎠᎩᏘᏏ ᏃᎴ ᎠᎩᏙᏓ
hia agitisi nole agidoda


THIS IS MY MOM AND DAD


a great way to introduce your parents to someone else!


now, are you ready for more?


===
is this my mom & dad?
ᎯᎠᏍᎪ ᎠᎩᏥ ᏃᎴ ᎠᎩᏙᏓ?
hiasgo agitsi nole agidoda?
ᎯᎠᏍᎪ ᏣᏥ ᏃᎴ ᏣᏙᏓ?
is this your mom & dad?
hiasgo tsatsi nole tsadoda?
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — your mom
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — your dad
ᎠᎩᏥ - agi-tsi  my mother
ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agidoda) — my dad
place the following in the form of a question if you are asking instead of stating

ᎯᏙᏓ (hitsi) — you are his/her mom
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahitsi) — you are their mom


MOMMY WORDS


ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agitsi) — my mom
ᎩᏂᏙᏓ (ginitsi) — mom of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏙᏓ (oginitsi) — mom of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏙᏓ (igitsi) — our mom (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏙᏓ (ogitsi) — our mom (excluding you)
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — your mom
ᏍᏗᏙᏓ (sditsi) — mom of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏙᏓ (itsitsi) — your mom (three or more)
ᎤᏙᏓ (utsi) — his/her mom
ᎤᏂᏙᏓ (unitsi) — their mom
ᎬᏙᏓ (gvtsi) — I am your mom
ᏍᏛᏙᏓ (sdvtsi) — I am your mom (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏙᏓ (itsvtsi) — I am your mom (three or more)
ᏥᏙᏓ (tsitsi) — I am his/her mom
ᎦᏥᏙᏓ (gatsitsi) — I am their mom
ᏍᎩᏙᏓ (sgitsi) — you are my mom
ᏍᎩᏂᏙᏓ (sginitsi) — you are our mom (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏙᏓ (isgitsi) — you are our mom (three or more)
ᎯᏙᏓ (hitsi) — you are his/her mom
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahitsi) — you are their mom
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — she is your mom



DADDY WORDS



ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agidoda) — my dad
ᎩᏂᏙᏓ (ginidoda) — dad of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏙᏓ (oginidoda) — dad of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏙᏓ (igidoda) — our dad (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏙᏓ (ogidoda) — our dad (excluding you)
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — your dad
ᏍᏗᏙᏓ (sdidoda) — dad of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏙᏓ (itsidoda) — your dad (three or more)
ᎤᏙᏓ (udoda) — his/her dad
ᎤᏂᏙᏓ (unidoda) — their dad
ᎬᏙᏓ (gvdoda) — I am your dad
ᏍᏛᏙᏓ (sdvdoda) — I am your dad (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏙᏓ (itsvdoda) — I am your dad (three or more)
ᏥᏙᏓ (tsidoda) — I am his/her dad
ᎦᏥᏙᏓ (gatsidoda) — I am their dad
ᏍᎩᏙᏓ (sgidoda) — you are my dad
ᏍᎩᏂᏙᏓ (sginidoda) — you are our dad (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏙᏓ (isgidoda) — you are our dad (three or more)
ᎯᏙᏓ (hidoda) — you are his/her dad
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahidoda) — you are their dad
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — he is your dad


===========
EXTRA:

ᎠᎩᏓᏅᏟ (agidanvtli) — my brother
ᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (ginidanvtli) — brother of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (oginidanvtli) — brother of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏓᏅᏟ (igidanvtli) — our brother (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏓᏅᏟ (ogidanvtli) — our brother (excluding you)
ᏣᏓᏅᏟ (tsadanvtli) — your brother
ᏍᏗᏓᏅᏟ (sdidanvtli) — brother of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏓᏅᏟ (itsidanvtli) — your brother (three or more)
ᎤᏓᏅᏟ (udanvtli) — his/her brother
ᎤᏂᏓᏅᏟ (unidanvtli) — their brother
ᎬᏓᏅᏟ (gvdanvtli) — I am your brother
ᏍᏛᏓᏅᏟ (sdvdanvtli) — I am your brother (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏓᏅᏟ (itsvdanvtli) — I am your brother (three or more)
ᏥᏓᏅᏟ (tsidanvtli) — I am his/her brother
ᎦᏥᏓᏅᏟ (gatsidanvtli) — I am their brother
ᏍᎩᏓᏅᏟ (sgidanvtli) — you are my brother
ᏍᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (sginidanvtli) — you are our brother (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏓᏅᏟ (isgidanvtli) — you are our brother (three or more)
ᎢᏓᎵᏅᏟ / ᎯᏓᏅᏟ (hidanvtli) — you are his/her brother (dialectical difference)
ᎦᎯᏓᏅᏟ (gahidanvtli) — you are their brother
ᏣᏓᏅᏟ (tsadanvtli) — he is your brother
ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏟ (anadanvtli) -our brother (everyone's brother, including me and him)

What if she is right? 10K Hours to expertly learn a language

she says that no one wants to believe it takes that long--

but

what if she is right?

then I suggest- we start SOONER rather than LATER!

Now, rather than in the future.

Today, rather than tomorrow!

Friday, October 09, 2015

Public Domain or Copyrighted?

Language cannot be copy righted but sometimes, arrangments can be.


Right now, we received word that there is a dispute about one of our Cherokee Songs.


Someone by name of "CASH#" claimed it as theirs and has monetized it, making money off of ads.
Since we disputed it, they have not received funds, but soon, that may expire.


Rather than involving attorneys, we will be taking down the song.


For now -- and not for much longer-- you can still hear it here at
https://youtu.be/1eFREsJXESM


BACKGROUND ON THIS SONG:




Uploaded on Sep 9, 2008
TUNE is a PUBLIC DOMAIN Swedish folk Melody that has Russian, German and other languages used with it however Throughout all of these translations, the original Swedish folk tune remained the same and is still public domain.

One of the best-loved gospel songs worldwide, This tune began as a nine-stanza hymn of praise, "O Store Gud" ("O Great God"), written in 1885 by Swedish poet and lay minister Carl Gustav Boberg (1859--1940). In 1891 Boberg published the poem, accompanied by a Swedish folk melody, in Sanningsvittnet (Witness for the Truth), a weekly Christian journal of which he was editor.

Today, the tune is commonly named "Sanningsvittnet" in hymnals.

From its Swedish origins, the text was translated to German in 1907, then to Russian in 1912. The Russian text became the basis for a translation to English by Stuart W. K. Hine (1899--1989), a British Methodist missionary who took it in 1931 while on mission in the Ukraine. The tune gained great popularity in North America after George Beverly Shea began singing a version of it in the Billy Graham evangelistic crusades in 1955. It has been named the #1 favorite hymn by respondents to various polls in both the United States and United Kingdom.

This version is a poem from the Cherokee; Translation /provided below/ into Giduwa /eastern/ Cherokee of a SWEDISH FOLK MELODYfrom 1895 by ME sung slower so you can catch the words as you learn The words are in eastern dialect a hymn of praise

Sorry about the ad showing on this! As you know, I do NOT make ANY $ off my language videos! I am against putting ads on them---therefore, I filed a dispute with YOUTUBE but My NEXT STEP is to TAKE IT DOWN rather than allow ADS to be on it!

the few clip arts used are from http://www.freepixels.com/terms/
=============================
I have tried everything to not allow it but YOUTUBE has it locked even though I have NOT monetized any of my videos

SOMEONE going by a false name is claiming copyright of this song despite the public domain status of the ORIGINAL SOURCE- SWEDISH MELODY (Public Domain) "Sanningsvittnet"

EVEN THOUGH I did my own translation (Eastern Cherokee Dialect) of an old Cherokee Poem
even though it is my OWN VOICE even though the clip art is free uses and even though all the other pictures were taken with MY OWN CAMERA

even though the arrangement is accappella and it is my own arrangement
even though it is in the public domain!

Yes- we did identify the tune most people know this as, but that does not change the source was and remains the public domain Swedish folk melody.

This is a Christian hymn based on a Swedish traditional melody and INSPIRED BY A poem written by Carl Gustav Boberg 1859–1940 in Sweden in 1885 but it is NOT a direct translation of his poem but is rather a Cherokee poem set to the Swedish melody

that makes it PUBLIC DOMAIN
Also- I did my own translation and it is my own voice singing my own arrangement of it.

IN THE CHEROKEE LANGUAGE


Cherokee language hymn PHONETICS

To show this is NOT the song "owned" by anyone else- I am providing a loose translation of what the Cherokee is saying:


1.U ne hla nv i tsa gv wi yu hi tsa ti ni gi di do yu ge li sgo Da ta gi sgo
Ayv da qua os da tsi go di sgo e lo hi tso hla na

/He is Creator
He is our Chief
I see what he has made
I see it is good
everything made on this world/


CHORUS
Agwa da ta / My emotions
De Ka no gi sgo I /I am making music/
No sa ni hi /this about you are/
No sa ni hi /this about you are/
Agwa da ta /My emotions/
De ka no gi sgo I /I am making music/
No sa ni hi /this about you are/
No sa ni hi /this about you are/
/Continued/

ge do ha i a do di tso ga nv hi tsi squa d a ni
no gi sta ga t a ni
/what I am thinking about now/
u wo da hv /nice/
ga d u i wi tsi do do u no le tso
na hna uno ya ga
/the land I know, the wind, and the weather/
CHORUS
/1 continued/i ga hu tsa da ye di ta yo se hi
Di sgi yo ti
Nu ga di tse na sa
E lo di wi da na di sa do di e di lo quo da d a di no gi sdi
/things I see the world painted so beautiful/
CHORUS

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Alive or Dead? Its really up to YOU!

Everyone has a different defintion or TEST for whether or not Cherokee is a "living" or a "dead" language.


But, there is really a very simple way to tell:


To TRULY be ALIVE-


a language must be spoken by
EVERYONE,
EVERYWHERE
at ALL TIMES in the Community-


if you don't hear it spoken this way-
then that language is DEAD.


Dead languages are reserved for certain special occasions;

Dead languages are only spoken by a select few people,

and use of a dead language is restricted to a particular place or location


NOW that you know how to tell if its alive or dead---


PLEASE don't let YOUR language DIE!


Keep it alive- speak it EVERYWHERE to EVERYONE


See, for your language to LIVE-- it must be USED everyday, all the time, everywhere by EVERYONE.


Start speaking Cherokee today.


Even if you only know ONE WORD use that ONE WORD every time you can instead of its English Equivalent.


This language can live.


it just needs your breath!

Cherokee Bible Day is TOMORROW

Cherokee Bible Day is September 18.
That is when families & individuals begin to commemorate the efforts of everyone involved in translating the bible into Cherokee.
September 20 is when CHURCHES commemorate these efforts, many of which receive an offering that is used to buy CHEROKEE BIBLES for young and Old folks who want to read it in their own language.


You can download a ROUGH DRAFT of some prayers you may choose to use during the next 30 days.


Please pray that the project of translation will be completed.

Please pray that all of the translated portions will be made available FREE online to anyone who wants them (We are working on this!)


Please pray for everyone that works on these 2 projects.


You may download the PDF of the rough draft of the prayer book here:
https://sites.google.com/site/tsasuyed/30-days-of-prayer


The finished copy (we expect) will be reviewed by an editor and placed online for those who want it- but we don't have an estimated time that will be completed.


SGI/Wado/ Thank you for your patience!


Oh!
almost forgot:


here is a short and  easy to learn to sing song for CHEROKEE BIBLE DAYS


https://youtu.be/-l39slsXO4Y




This is a good, short chorus for learning syllabary







THIS SONG:
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩᏃ!
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩ!
ᏱᎰᏩᏃ!
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!
  (ᏱᎰᏩᏃ!)
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!
    (ᏱᎰᏩᏃ!)
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!
     (ᏱᎰᏩᏃ!)
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!


TRANSLATION:


ᏱᎰᏩ!= YHWH (Lord/Jehovah) This is a FOREIGN word; comes from the Hebrew and introduced to the language through missionaries and the Bible but was not originally a Cherokee word, however, it has been in use among the Cherokee since the 1700's.
ᏱᎰᏩᏃ! = YHWH (Lord/ Jehovah with Honorific)
ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ!= (imperative) Praise Ye him/her (by implication in this context: All of you Praise the Lord!)

Giduwa Dialect ᏦᎭᎾ ᏣᏑᏰᏓ ᎻᎩᏍ ᏫᏍ


MORE Psalms of David at
https://sites.google.com/site/cherokeepsalms/psalms







Wednesday, September 16, 2015

2nd Book of Moses: Exodus

Friends, a book collector offered us a pristine copy of EXODUS for $3,500.00


Too much!


We explained that we are not attempting to "collect" but instead want the data/words to SHARE.


So, they hunted, and found a less than pristine but still legible copy but it is still $900!


Well, if 18 folks could donate $50 toward this- we could purchase it - use it to transcribe it to the website where EVERYONE can read it--
and donate the original document to an archive or museum.


Let me know if you are interested! :)



Saturday, September 05, 2015

1 Kings 17 in CHEROKEE

Praise to the Creator for Providing!
We received a fragment of this via ups! we will be posting that and praying for more!
we were given the translation of 1 Kings 17:1-12
Text indicates it was translated by A. N. Chamberlain, who married into the family / a person related to Cherokee Betsy Pack of Jasper.  A. N. Chamberlain lived in the Sequatchie Tennessee Valley Area before removal to the west.


https://sites.google.com/site/cherokeebibleproject/old-testament-verses/1-kings/1-kings-17


1 Kings 17
ᎢᏏᎵᎩ ᏅᏂᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᏦᎢᏁ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎯ
ᎠᏯdᎸ 17
isiligi nvnigvwiyuhi kanohesgi tsoine gowelanvhi
ayadlv 17



17:1
And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilead, said unto Ahab, As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word.
1
ᎾᏉᏃ ᎢᎳᏣ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏗᏏᏘᏗ ᎩᎵᏯᏗ ᎠᏁᎯ ᏅᏙᏣᎵ, ᎡᎮᏈ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏪᎭᎴᎢ, ᏥᏄᏙᎯᏨᎭ ᎡᎲ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᎢᏏᎵ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎦ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᎵ ᏥᏯᏁᎴᎯ ᏥᎩ, ᎥᏝ ᏴᏛᎯᏌᏔᏂ  ᎠᎴ ᏴᏛᎦᎿᏂ ᎯᎠ ᏓᏕᏘᏴᎯᏒ, ᎬᏂ ᎠᏴ ᏥᏁᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.
1
naquono ilatsa nasgi adisitidi giliyadi anehi nvdotsali, ehequi hia nuwehalei, tsinudohitsvha ehv yihowa unelanvhi isili unatseliga, nasgi igvyidili tsiyanelehi tsigi, vtla yvdvhisatani ale yvdvgahnani hia dadetiyvhisv, gvni ayv tsinegv nasgi gesesdi.
17:2
And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying,
2 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎷᏤᎴ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎧᏁᎬᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏪᏍᎬᎢ
2 ale nasgi ulutsele yihowa kanegvi, hia nigawesgvi



17:3
3 Get thee hence, and turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
3 ᎠᏂ ᎭᏓᏅᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎧᎸᎩ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏫᎿᏛᏁᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᏩᏗᏍᎦᎸᎦ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
3 ani hadanvna, ale dikalvgi iditlv wihnadvneda, ale wadisgalvga usdi uweyv tsilidi nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.



17:4

4 And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there.
4  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏕᏍᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᎭᏗᏔᏍᎨᏍᏗ; ᎠᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏤᎳᏍᏗ ᎦᏥᎾᏬᏍᏔᏅ ᎪᎳᏅ.
4  ale nasgi nusdesdi, nasgi usdi uweyv haditasgesdi; ala nahna getselasdi gatsinawostanv golanv.
17:5
5 So he went and did according unto the word of the Lord: for he went and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
5 ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏐᏩ ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᏨ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᏄᏛᏁᎴᎢ, ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏰᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᎥ ᎤᏕᏁᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
5 nasgino sowa uwenvse yihowa unetsv nasgiya nudvnelei, uwenvse yeno ale usdi uweyv tsilidi nav udenei, nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.
17:6
6 And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
6 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏑᎾᎴ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᎧᏯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏩᏲᎮᎮ ᎪᎳᏅ, ᎤᏒᏃ  ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᏫᏯ;  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎨᏴ ᎠᏗᏔᏍᎨᎢ.
6 ale nasgi sunale gesv gadu ale hakaya nasgi gvwayohehe golanv, usvno  gadu ale hawiya;  ale nasgi usdi geyv aditasgei.






More to come! stay posted! :)


Thank you for your patience; due to my job (52-53 hours weekly) it takes me some time to get things done.