Thursday, July 20, 2017

Learning to read Sequoyan Script

Learning to read Sequoyah's script is important because

--each syllable is a morpheme and it DOES have meaning that you need to know and understand how to use

--the written meaning remains the same no matter the differences in pronunciation or dialects

--old documents are available that will help you learn the language faster if you know how to read them

--fewer speakers are available to study with and work with and it is vital that original source documents be accessible to you for learning

--literacy develops the brain's use of syntax and grammar almost "unconsciously" as opposed to untold hours of agonizing study 

--literacy develops better speakers and is the first step on the path to real fluency

--the cultural significance of Sequoyah's Syllabary masterpiece only becomes fully realized once one can read it


But-- how do we learn to read?

Many, many friends have tried this and told me THIS WORKS!

First, they attend our workshop on syllabary and then -- on a daily basis-- they write out a song we share in that syllabary workshop AND

they watch specific videos we have posted on YOUTUBE.

We have decided that

although it is important to go to the seminar
and
although the song that is written out daily is important too

we decided to SHARE that specific set of videos (minus 2 that are only available to workshop participants) with EVERYONE who watches YOUTUBE.

So- you may not have the seminar or the song but you CAN write out the syllabary using a chart.


So do that daily 





AND


watch this YOUTUBE PLAYLIST

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvT2Y0DiT0goAycQ6sk686sJdU5pv2G1Z


 - and SING ALONG!- 3x a day every day
Sing these songs in the playlist while READING along with the screen
--do this--

Of course, you could



-- in addition to using your flashcards and writing out the syllabary as you say the pronunciations-- every day-- and you WILL learn to read. 

Join this with our workshop we offer and you will become literate in Sequoyan Syllabary. Contact Cherokee Bible Project to set up a workshop for your group. 



Tle- versus Tse- prefix

As you know from previous posts and if you have studied other Cherokee Grammar sources,

Eastern dialect does not use the   Ꮬ-Ꮭ/Ꮮ/Ꮯ/Ꮰ/Ꮱ/Ꮲ  tla/tle/tli/tlo/tlu/tlv line and instead replaces the old words with those spellings with Ꮳ/Ꮴ/Ꮵ/Ꮶ/Ꮷ/Ꮸ tsa/tse/tsi/tso/tsu/tsv.

[note:  remember, this is not true of the list of western words that changed their spelling during the Cherokee seminary years {this refers to word spellings that changed from Ꮃ/Ꮄ/Ꮅ/Ꮆ/Ꮇ/Ꮈ la/le/li/lo/lu/lv and were (from then on) spelled with Ꮬ-Ꮭ/Ꮮ/Ꮯ/Ꮰ/Ꮱ/Ꮲ  tla/tle/tli/tlo/tlu/tlv  syllables;  eastern words still use the spellings of Ꮃ/Ꮄ/Ꮅ/Ꮆ/Ꮇ/Ꮈ la/le/li/lo/lu/lv for those words but the western dialect uses Ꮬ-Ꮭ/Ꮮ/Ꮯ/Ꮰ/Ꮱ/Ꮲ  tla/tle/tli/tlo/tlu/tlv} but this blog is not dealing with that issue at this time]

Common words that you may see 
this "Swap" on include the words for 
"Tree"  
[ᏡᎬ / ᏧᎬ tlugv / tsugv]
and 
"Don't touch it!". (A word little kids hear a LOT! lol!)
[ᏞᏍᏗ / ᏤᏍᏗ tlesdi / tsesdi]

The New Testament uses the western spelling (also the "Tennessee Dialect") for those words but the Big Covers use the old eastern dialect.

You can see/hear that difference in this old song found on Youtube HERE:  
https://youtu.be/KTDL5oDTRWg

Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ


compare that to the language found in the New Testament in the Other Dialect:

Colossians 2:21
(Touch not; taste not; handle not;
ᎪᎶᏏ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎨᎪᏪᎳᏁᎸᎯ 2:21
(ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏁᏨᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏕᏲᏅᎯ? ᎾᏍᎩ ᏞᏍᏗ ᏣᏒᏂᎸᎩ; ᏞᏍᏗ ᎤᏍᏗᎤᏅ ᏣᎬᎩ; ᏞᏍᏗ ᏣᏱᏙᎸᎩ;
go-lo-si a-ne-hi ge-go-we-la-ne-lv-hi 2:21
(Yv-wi u-ni-ne-tsv-hi a-le tsu-na-de-yo-nv-hi? na-s-gi tle-s-di tsa-sv-ni-lv-gi; tle-s-di u-s-di-u-nv tsa-gv-gi; tle-s-di tsa-yi-do-lv-gi;
golosi anehi gegowelanelvhi 2:21
(yvwi uninetsvhi ale tsunadeyonvhi? nasgi tlesdi tsasvnilvi; tlesdi usdiunvtsagvgi; tlesdi tsayidolvgi;

[NOTE:  verse 21 is continuing the rhetorical question that was begun in verse 20]

Now- that would be -- using the old Big Cove Dialect--

Colossians 2:21
(Touch not; taste not; handle not;
ᎪᎶᏏ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎨᎪᏪᎳᏁᎸᎯ 2:21
(ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏁᏨᎯ ᏃᎴ [ᎠᎴ] ᏧᎾᏕᏲᏅᎯ? ᎾᏍᎩ ᏤᏍᏗ ᏣᏒᏂᎸᎩ; ᏤᏍᏗ ᎤᏍᏗᎤᏅ ᏣᎬᎩ; ᏤᏍᏗ ᏣᏱᏙᎸᎩ;
go-lo-si a-ne-hi ge-go-we-la-ne-lv-hi 2:21
(Yv-wi u-ni-ne-tsv-hi a-le tsu-na-de-yo-nv-hi? na-s-gi tse-s-di tsa-sv-ni-lv-gi; tse-s-di u-s-di-u-nv tsa-gv-gi; tse-s-di tsa-yi-do-lv-gi;
golosi anehi gegowelanelvhi 2:21

(yvwi uninetsvhi ale tsunadeyonvhi? nasgi tsesdi tsasvnilvi; tsesdi usdiunvtsagvgi; tsesdi tsayidolvgi;

Comparing in this way may help you to use more resources in your language learning.

Written documents- no matter which document- become easier to use in the dialect YOU have chosen to study/use when you know this little "trick" for swapping out the spelling/pronunciation.

Just be careful of the words that the Seminary years changed their spelling and you will be fine (you can look at the original Gritt's list and see what those words are).

Having more written resources to study and learn from can only be beneficial to all of us as students.

So don't let a documents use/choice of dialect stop you from learning from it.

You now know an important way to adjust for the dialect you wish to learn and use.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

En Espanol!

Someone contacted us and as a reminder, requested a re-post of the link to the Bilingual Cherokee/Spanish website.

That site is under construction still but here is the link as requested:

https://sites.google.com/site/bibliaencheroqui/


And of course, we always need volunteers for this project and others.

To help,

simply select the website page you wish to work on.

Copy the URL of that page onto wordpad or notepad and also copy the website selection's information to wordpad or notepad and compare the words to an original source document such as a printed Cherokee Bible and either a KJV English Bible or, in the case of the Spanish page, the Reina-Valera (1960).

You can find those online at Biblegateway.

Once you have copied the website selection onto notepad or wordpad, make corrections that are needed.

After you make corrections, please

help us to know which -of any-- corrections needed with a highlighted text color and copy that text into an email and send to our email address along with a copy of the URL of that particular page you are making corrections to for us.

That's all there is to it!



Friday, July 07, 2017

Seminar Availability 2017

Siyo!

A cancellation has opened up a place in our summer schedule.

July 20 & 21 are available for a 2 day language & culture seminar.
(Thursday/Friday 2017)

There are 2 course options:

--If you have never held one of our seminars, we suggest the first of the series which is a 2 day course is designed to set Cherokee Second Language Learners on the right path for success in speaking.

--If you have participated in one of our introductory seminars, we now offer a second seminar that brings the speaker further into the language as well as provides necessary instruction for participants to begin teaching others.

The suggested minimum donation for this 2 day seminar is $800 and a request for additional provided lodging, meals and travel costs. (lodging and meals are requested for the evening prior and throughout the seminar).

This will generally be for one person and no more than 2 of our staff volunteers will ever be presenting.

We generally receive more for a 2 day seminar, but since a non-refundable deposit accompanied this time slot, we are offering this for the remaining amount, which may make it more affordable for your group this year.

Contact us for more information if you are interested in scheduling this time for your own.
888.743.7775
tsasuyed (at@) gmail 
(replace that email address with proper format in order to send email; this format shown helps us to slow down the spammers a tad)

That time does not fit your group's schedule?  We still have some unfilled summer timeslots left --but not very many.

Adsense complained my blog has too much Cherokee!

Google believes my blog is PRIMARILY in the CHEROKEE language rather than in English.
oh, if only that were true!
Sadly, most of my blog is in English.
I have explained that my blog does explain Cherokee language but is primarily in ENGLISH.
I may need to find another venue once they are done reviewing my posts.

I will notify everyone if I need to switch, when /if that happens.

PS-- apparently, google thought my blog was actually in some arabic language but we are trying to straighten this out.

Notating Ordinals

Siyo!

Have you wondered about making abbreviations in Cherokee?

What?  No one told you that Cherokee HAS abbreviations?

Well, it DOES.
Very many in fact.

To get us started in thinking of abbreviated Cherokee, lets look at the simplest form of these:

Ordinal numbers.

I don't know about you, but learning ordinals in English took a minute or two to wrap my head around.

Remember, we learned these in Kindergarten/ First grade, which means they are so easy for us now we may have forgotten that struggle, but believe me, it was a "thing" for most young scholars.

English bounces around a bit in ordinals, and those learning it find the

 "-st", "-rd", and "-th" a tough concept to navigate.  But they are not so important in English that you couldn't just leave them off and be understood.

Cherokee is NOT that way.  You must NOT leave these out.

In Cherokee, Ordinals are more important than they are in English.

More on that later.

What I want to stress today is how to notate the ordinal in Cherokee.

I find that the system of switching from writing it out is much easier in Cherokee than it is in English.

In Cherokee, most writers/speakers use the Arabic number followed by either "-" or "-".

That's it!

Just learn to say the Cherokee Ordinal number correctly in your dialect of Cherokee and add either  "-" or "-".

Here's a hint:  only 1st (or 1) uses the "-Ᏹ " !


Here is the full image:



To see the larger picture, click on this image below:

























Ok

now that you know HOW to use them, how about from now on, replacing all your English ordinal notations with Cherokee ordinal notation?

Save the language.

use it!

Friday, June 30, 2017

Learn a simple prayer in Cherokee

Many folks want to learn a prayer in Cherokee they can say for their lunch time.
This prayer is not a traditional prayer, but was given to me when I asked about how to say the popular children's prayer "God is Great, God is good, let us thank him for our food" etc.,
The prayer below is NOT word for word for that even but it is (IMHO) acceptable.

The western dialect  would sound very different from this one.

ᎤᏓᏙᎵᏍᏗ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎢ

ᎤᎵᏂᎩᏓ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎢ

ᎢᏓᎵᎮᎵᎨᏍᏗ ᎢᎦ[Ꭰ]ᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ

ᏧᏬᏰᏂ ᎬᏗ ᎢᎨᏦᎰ

ᎯᎪᎢᎦ ᏍᎩᎥᏏ ᎦᏚ

ᎾᏍᎩᏉᏫᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗ

ᎡᎺᏅ



ᎤᏓᏙᎵᏍᏗ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎢ
He is gracious / Creator
ᎤᎵᏂᎩᏓ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎢ
he is strong / Creator
ᎢᏓᎵᎮᎵᎨᏍᏗ ᎢᎦ[Ꭰ]ᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ
(imperative) Everyone give thanks for our food
ᏧᏬᏰᏂ ᎬᏗ ᎢᎨᏦᎰ
your hands /  use / I am fed
ᎯᎪᎢᎦ ᏍᎩᎥᏏ ᎦᏚ
this day /  give [the lump] to me, / bread
ᎾᏍᎩᏉᏫᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗ
let it be that way
ᎡᎺᏅ
borrowed word: Amen

Thursday, June 22, 2017

A note about DIALECTS

a NOTE ABOUT DIALECTS: 

The Cherokee Bible was produced in the dialect used in middle Tennessee in the area from Ross' Landing (present day Chattanooga) to the Running water towns (up around Jasper, TN) and over to Snowbird (the Robbinsville, NC area).  

To use the Bible in western dialect of Oklahoma no significant changes need to be accommodated.

However, to use the Bible in the Eastern Dialect of the Big Cove area, you need to know the following:

snowbird and Oklahoma use the top row (as shown below)
but eastern (Big cove) does not.

For the same sounds in western, the Eastern dialect only uses the 2nd row as shown below

Swapping out the syllable from one to the other will not change the meaning of the word except in words that were changed after the Female and male seminaries changed the spelling of some words (see the Levi Gritts original dictionary for those words) but more on that in another post.
dlatla tle tli tlotlutlv
tsa tse tsi tsotsutsv

Monday, February 13, 2017

Looking for the LOST BOOKS

As you know, we have a FRAGMENT of this book:

https://sites.google.com/site/cherokeebibleproject/old-testament-verses/1-kings/1-kings-17


We are looking for the other chapters.  We have been told they DO exist.

Contact me if you can help us unearth these buried treasures!

BTW, we are a 501c3 so your gifts may be tax deductible.

===
ᏏᎵᎩ ᏅᏂᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᏦᎢᏁ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎯ

ᎠᏯdᎸ 17
isiligi nvnigvwiyuhi kanohesgi tsoine gowelanvhi
ayadlv 17

17:1
And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilead, said unto Ahab, As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word.
1
ᎾᏉᏃ ᎢᎳᏣ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏗᏏᏘᏗ ᎩᎵᏯᏗ ᎠᏁᎯ ᏅᏙᏣᎵ, ᎡᎮᏈ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏪᎭᎴᎢ, ᏥᏄᏙᎯᏨᎭ ᎡᎲ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᎢᏏᎵ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎦ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᎵ ᏥᏯᏁᎴᎯ ᏥᎩ, ᎥᏝ ᏴᏛᎯᏌᏔᏂ  ᎠᎴ ᏴᏛᎦᎿᏂ ᎯᎠ ᏓᏕᏘᏴᎯᏒ, ᎬᏂ ᎠᏴ ᏥᏁᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.
1
naquono ilatsa nasgi adisitidi giliyadi anehi nvdotsali, ehequi hia nuwehalei, tsinudohitsvha ehv yihowa unelanvhi isili unatseliga, 
nasgi igvyidili tsiyanelehi tsigi, vtla yvdvhisatani ale yvdvgahnani hia dadetiyvhisv, gvni ayv tsinegv nasgi gesesdi.

17:2
And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying,
2 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎷᏤᎴ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎧᏁᎬᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏪᏍᎬᎢ
2 ale nasgi ulutsele yihowa kanegvi, hia nigawesgvi

17:3
3 Get thee hence, and turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
3 ᎠᏂ ᎭᏓᏅᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎧᎸᎩ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏫᎿᏛᏁᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᏩᏗᏍᎦᎸᎦ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
3 ani hadanvna, ale dikalvgi iditlv wihnadvneda, ale wadisgalvga usdi uweyv tsilidi nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.

17:4
4 And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there.
4  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏕᏍᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᎭᏗᏔᏍᎨᏍᏗ; ᎠᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏤᎳᏍᏗ ᎦᏥᎾᏬᏍᏔᏅ ᎪᎳᏅ.
4  ale nasgi nusdesdi, nasgi usdi uweyv haditasgesdi; ala nahna getselasdi gatsinawostanv golanv.

17:5
5 So he went and did according unto the word of the Lord: for he went and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
5 ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏐᏩ ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᏨ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᏄᏛᏁᎴᎢ, ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏰᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᎥ ᎤᏕᏁᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
5 nasgino sowa uwenvse yihowa unetsv nasgiya nudvnelei, uwenvse yeno ale usdi uweyv tsilidi nav udenei, nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.

17:6
6 And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
6 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏑᎾᎴ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᎧᏯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏩᏲᎮᎮ ᎪᎳᏅ, ᎤᏒᏃ  ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᏫᏯ;  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎨᏴ ᎠᏗᏔᏍᎨᎢ.
6 ale nasgi sunale gesv gadu ale hakaya nasgi gvwayohehe golanv, usvno  gadu ale hawiya;  ale nasgi usdi geyv aditasgei.


7 And it came to pass after a while, that the brook dried up, because there had been no rain in the land.
7  ᎢᎸᏍᎩᏃ ᏫᏄᏬᎯᏨ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᎴ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏬᏲᏐᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎨᏴᎢ, ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᏒ ᏄᎦᎿᏅᏫ ᎨᏒᎢ.
7  ilvsgino winuwohitsv nasgi nulistanile, nasgi uwoyosone nahna usdi geyvi, nvdigalisdodisge nahna ayeli gesv nugahnanvwi gesvi.

8 And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying,
8 ᎠᎴ ᎤᎷᏤᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎰᏩ ᏬᏁᎬ, ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏪᏍᎬᎢ.
8 ale ulutsele nasgi yihowa wonegv, hia nigawesgvi.

9 Arise, get thee to Zarephath, which belongeth to Zidon, and dwell there: behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee.
9 ᏔᎵᎲᎦ, ᏥᎵᏆᏗ ᏫᎶᎯ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏙᏂ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎪᎯ ᏥᎩ, ᎠᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎭᏕᎲᎦ:  ᎬᏂᏳᏉ ᏥᏁᏤᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏬᏑᎶᏨᎯ ᎠᎨᏴ ᏣᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗᏱ.
9 talihvga, tsiliquadi wilohi, nasgi sadoni unatseligohi tsigi, ala nahna hadehvga:  gvniyuquo tsinetselv nahna uwosulotsvhi ageyv tsasquanigododiyi.

10 So he arose and went to Zarephath. And when he came to the gate of the city, behold, the widow woman was there gathering of sticks: and he called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.
10  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏚᎴᏁ ᏥᎵᏆᏗ ᏭᏣᏎᎢ.  ᎾᏉᏃ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᏍᏚᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᎷᏣ, ᎬᏂᏨᏉ ᎾᎿ ᎡᏙᎮ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏬᏑᎶᏨᎯ ᎠᎨᏴ ᎦᎾᏍᏓ ᏚᎫᏘᏍᎨᎢ.  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎵᏍᏗᏁᎴᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᏄᏪᏎᎢ, ᎡᏍᎩᏁᏦᎯᏏ ᏊᎦᎭ, ᎤᏍᏗ ᎠᎹ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏗᏔᏍᏗᏱ.
10  nasgino dulene tsiliquadi wutsasei.  naquono gaduhv asduisdi ulutsa, gvnitsvquo nahna edohe nasgi uwosulotsvhi ageyv ganasda dugutisgei.  nasgino ulisdinelei, hia nuwesei, esginetsohisi quugaha, usdi ama nasgi aquaditasdiyi.

11 And as she was going to fetch it, he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.
11  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎦᏁᎩᏎᎬ, ᎢᎤᎵᏍᏔᏁᎴᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏬᏎᎢ; ᏍᎩᏲᎮᎸ ᏇᎦᎭ ᏏᏅᏍᎦᎶᏗ ᎢᎦᎢ ᎦᏚ ᏣᏒᎦᎴᏍᏗᏉ.
11  nasgino aisv ganegisegv, iulistanelei, ale hia nuwosei; sgiyohelv quegaha sinvsgalodi igai gadu tsasvgalesdiquo.

12 And she said, As the Lord thy God liveth, I have not a cake, but an handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse: and, behold, I am gathering two sticks, that I may go in and dress it for me and my son, that we may eat it, and die.
12  ᎯᎠᏃ ᏅᏧᏬᏎᎢ, ᏥᏄᏙᎯᏳᎭ ᏱᎰᏩ ᏣᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᎡᎲ Ꮭ ᏌᏉᏅᎾ ᎦᏚ ᏯᎩᎭ, ᏏᏂᎦᏙᎵᏉ ᏍᎩᏂ ᎢᎦᎢ ᎢᏒ.
12  hiano nvtsuwosei, tsinudohiyuha yihowa tsanelanvhi ehv tla saquonvna gadu yagiha, sinigadoliquo sgini igai isv.


~~~~~~~

13 And Elijah said unto her, Fear not; go and do as thou hast said: but make me thereof a little cake first, and bring it unto me, and after make for thee and for thy son.
14 For thus saith the Lord God of Israel, The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.
15 And she went and did according to the saying of Elijah: and she, and he, and her house, did eat many days.
16 And the barrel of meal wasted not, neither did the cruse of oil fail, according to the word of the Lord, which he spake by Elijah.
17 And it came to pass after these things, that the son of the woman, the mistress of the house, fell sick; and his sickness was so sore, that there was no breath left in him.
18 And she said unto Elijah, What have I to do with thee, O thou man of God? art thou come unto me to call my sin to remembrance, and to slay my son?
19 And he said unto her, Give me thy son. And he took him out of her bosom, and carried him up into a loft, where he abode, and laid him upon his own bed.
20 And he cried unto the Lord, and said, O Lord my God, hast thou also brought evil upon the widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son?
21 And he stretched himself upon the child three times, and cried unto the Lord, and said, O Lord my God, I pray thee, let this child's soul come into him again.
22 And the Lord heard the voice of Elijah; and the soul of the child came into him again, and he revived.
23 And Elijah took the child, and brought him down out of the chamber into the house, and delivered him unto his mother: and Elijah said, See, thy son liveth.
24 And the woman said to Elijah, Now by this I know that thou art a man of God, and that the word of the Lord in thy mouth is truth.
King James Version (KJV)
by Public Domain


Cherokee Translation by A. N. Chamberlain, 1888
PUBLIC DOMAIN

Friday, July 15, 2016


Language


The Cherokee language is similar in some ways to the Iroquois family of languages. 

Each word can convey the meaning of an entire sentence.


WHOLE SENTENCES IN A SINGLE WORD

Cherokee is similar in some ways to the Iroquois family of languages, causing some to group it with them.  Others have demonstrated that Cherokee is distinctive enough to not fit in any other category and to stand alone among languages. 

Cherokee is a 'polysynthetic' language, which means that words are formed with a root, one or more affixes (always has a prefix) and a suffix.

A Cherokee word can thus be very long and can mean what actually corresponds to an entire sentence in other languages.

So get over thinking that you are learning words.  
You are actually learning sentences!

Each community will have its own unique way of saying a sentence and that sentence becomes the agreed upon meaning of a word.
Other communities may understand the "word-sentence" but they may not use the same "word-sentence" when speaking.

DIFFERENT DIALECTS

Historically, the Cherokee homeland covered the entire southeastern portion of the present day United States.  As the people were forced to live closer and closer to one another, and as entire populations of communities died from disease and refugee camp level living conditions, the dialects were forced to interact more closely with one another and some shifts occurred.  

Researchers such as the Kilpatrick's and many others were convinced that there were historically many more dialects than just the few that ethnologists like Mooney came up with, and today there are some communities that still have their own distinctive ways of speaking, but by and large, the different dialects you may hear today include these:

Oklahoma- often called the "western dialect" and it has the most speakers.
Robbinsville or "Snowbird"- sometimes called the "eastern dialect"  Western and Snowbird share more similarities with each other than all other eastern dialects do.  It has the 2nd most speakers of all the other dialects.
Yellowhill- which also claims the title of "eastern dialect".  Yellowhill and Snowbird have some similarities.
Big Cove- which is sometimes also referred to with the title of "eastern dialect" which actually has two variations of dialect, one which NEVER uses one entire line of syllabary, and another which uses the entire syllabary.

CHEROKEE LOAN WORDS

There are no cognates between English and Cherokee, however, there are some "borrowed" words that have come into use such as the word for watch "Wah chee" from the English and "Wa ga" from the Spanish for Cow (Vaca).When a word is "Borrowed" the last syllable of that word is always a rising tone.




A DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE



Every word in Cherokee is a sentence.  Each "word-sentence" that is very descriptive.

The word for "Wa-Ya" which is universally recognized to also mean "wolf" is a sentence which states "He is carrying the long rigid item".

As is the case for all languages, Cherokee continues to evolve, and when loan words are not used, new, highly descriptive words are created.

Cherokee is a very literal language.
For example, past additions to the lexicon include “computer,” which translates literally in English to “the thing that makes you lazy.”


As another example, Cherokee word for “attorney,” which is “didiyohihi.” The literal translation of “didiyohihi” is “s/he/it argues repeatedly and on purpose with a purpose.” 

The polysynthetic nature of the Cherokee language enables the language to develop new descriptive words in Cherokee to reflect or express new concepts.

One final example here is ᏗᏓᏂᏱᏍᎩ (didaniyisgi) which means "the final catcher" or "s/he/it catches them finally and conclusively." This is the Cherokee word for "policeman."
The written language and pronunciation are something else again and can be read about in several of the books on the language that are available, however nothing is as helpful as actually HEARING it spoken.

That is true with other languages as well, however, in Cherokee, it is even more important because


CHEROKEE IS A TONAL LANGUAGE.


In a tone language (tonal language), different tones (like in music, but not as many) will change the meaning of the words, even if the pronunciation of the word is the same otherwise. English and almost all other European languages are not tone languages at all.

This really complicates things for those who either learned English First or learned the languages together (bilingually) and some fluent speakers have commented that the bilingual folks never really seem to get the tone correct.

One of the best ways to indicate tone is to write out each word on a music staff in musical notation.  This helps more folks to start to get it right.





NOTE:  Cherokee Counts the Days of the Week from Monday through Sunday
(like most of the rest of the world, including Spain)




WHAT TO DO IF YOU WANT TO LEARN


If you want to learn the language you need to commit yourself to spending TIME to learn it.

TIME studying it.

TIME listening to it.

TIME speaking it either into a recording of yourself (Audadicity is free for your pc) or speaking to others.

If you commit yourself to AT LEAST two (2) hours per day for 6 days per week and AT LEAST one day per week for at least EIGHT (8) Hours (taking regular breaks like you would do for work)
doing the 3 things listed above (Studying, listening, speaking) 

then

You will have used your time well to fulfill the necessary 5,000+ hours that it takes to learn this language.

DON'T LET THIS SCARE YOU OFF!

What will you do?

Will you START NOW and look back 5 years from now and be GLAD you did?!
OR

Will you put it off and look back 5 years from now and WISH you had started?

The CHOICE IS YOURS!






Friday, July 08, 2016

Stop using English for SOUNDS- sound swap!

A super quick way to start speaking Cherokee and to start grasping the mindset of the language is to start replacing your English (or primary language) with Cherokee words and sounds.

Ever needed a "jump start" on your car or truck?

Well, onomatopoeia's can become a "jump start" for your language!

ONOMATOPOEIA

What's an onomatopoeia?  

It is a poetic way of describing a sound or can identify an animal or object with a sound.




The Greeks coined the word and the Latin borrowed it.  Our English is Latin based.

Story tellers and Poets often use onomatopoeia to access the reader’s auditory sense and create rich soundscapes.

My friend tells me that Onomatopoeia could be called (in the Cherokee Language) ᎤᏃᏴᎬ ᎠᏰᎵᏍᎩ “'unoyvgv ayelisgi' (sound imitator or sound mocker).” [Source: Dr. Durbin Feeling]

We have an entire unit theme on ONOMATOPOEIA's we have collected from various sources including old documents, books, and even speakers who were willing to share with us.

Its a bit much for a blog post so we won't post it all here 
BUT

we will give you a FEW just to get you jump started!

Remember, this is NOT a complete list of all the Cherokee onomatopoeia's (ᎤᏃᏴᎬ ᎠᏰᎵᏍᎩ) but it is a BEGINNING LIST.

Start using these in everyday life first.


Here we go!


What it describes   English Version      Cherokee 
                                                              Syllabary
                                                               & phonetic

Dog Barking                bow wow! woof! woof!                     Ꮧ! Ꮧ!  [di:!  di:!]

[note:  I think of "yip!" when I hear this]

Rooster Crow           cock-a-doodle-doo!         Ꭷ   ka-   ᎯᏰᎩ! /ᎢᏥᏰᎩ     [hiyegi! /itsiyegi]

clapping sound                   clap! clap!  clap!                     Ꮪ! Ꮪ! Ꮪ!   [du;! du:! du:!]

crow cawing                         caw, caw!                                    Ꭺ Ꭶ    [gho:ga!]

lightning                  flash (or zoom!)                   ᏌᏱ, ᏓᎻ!  [sa:yi!  da mi!]

thunder                                    crack!  boom!                               ᎯᎾᏚ  [hi:nadu:!]

footsteps approaching clop, clop, clop! E, E, E! [GV:! GV:! Gv:!]
(also, Drum sounds!) pa rum pa pum pum E, E,E, E, E!


REMEMBER

there are many MORE of these

but you can START right now by replacing your everyday English sounds with these CHEROKEE sounds instead!
Especially when you are telling BEDTIME STORIES to your children!

have FUN!