Thursday, June 22, 2017

A note about DIALECTS

a NOTE ABOUT DIALECTS: 

The Cherokee Bible was produced in the dialect used in middle Tennessee in the area from Ross' Landing (present day Chattanooga) to the Running water towns (up around Jasper, TN) and over to Snowbird (the Robbinsville, NC area).  

To use the Bible in western dialect of Oklahoma no significant changes need to be accommodated.

However, to use the Bible in the Eastern Dialect of the Big Cove area, you need to know the following:

snowbird and Oklahoma use the top row (as shown below)
but eastern (Big cove) does not.

For the same sounds in western, the Eastern dialect only uses the 2nd row as shown below

Swapping out the syllable from one to the other will not change the meaning of the word except in words that were changed after the Female and male seminaries changed the spelling of some words (see the Levi Gritts original dictionary for those words) but more on that in another post.
dlatla tle tli tlotlutlv
tsa tse tsi tsotsutsv

Monday, February 13, 2017

Looking for the LOST BOOKS

As you know, we have a FRAGMENT of this book:

https://sites.google.com/site/cherokeebibleproject/old-testament-verses/1-kings/1-kings-17


We are looking for the other chapters.  We have been told they DO exist.

Contact me if you can help us unearth these buried treasures!

BTW, we are a 501c3 so your gifts may be tax deductible.

===
ᏏᎵᎩ ᏅᏂᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᏦᎢᏁ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎯ

ᎠᏯdᎸ 17
isiligi nvnigvwiyuhi kanohesgi tsoine gowelanvhi
ayadlv 17

17:1
And Elijah the Tishbite, who was of the inhabitants of Gilead, said unto Ahab, As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but according to my word.
1
ᎾᏉᏃ ᎢᎳᏣ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏗᏏᏘᏗ ᎩᎵᏯᏗ ᎠᏁᎯ ᏅᏙᏣᎵ, ᎡᎮᏈ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏪᎭᎴᎢ, ᏥᏄᏙᎯᏨᎭ ᎡᎲ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᎢᏏᎵ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎦ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᎵ ᏥᏯᏁᎴᎯ ᏥᎩ, ᎥᏝ ᏴᏛᎯᏌᏔᏂ  ᎠᎴ ᏴᏛᎦᎿᏂ ᎯᎠ ᏓᏕᏘᏴᎯᏒ, ᎬᏂ ᎠᏴ ᏥᏁᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.
1
naquono ilatsa nasgi adisitidi giliyadi anehi nvdotsali, ehequi hia nuwehalei, tsinudohitsvha ehv yihowa unelanvhi isili unatseliga, 
nasgi igvyidili tsiyanelehi tsigi, vtla yvdvhisatani ale yvdvgahnani hia dadetiyvhisv, gvni ayv tsinegv nasgi gesesdi.

17:2
And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying,
2 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎷᏤᎴ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎧᏁᎬᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏪᏍᎬᎢ
2 ale nasgi ulutsele yihowa kanegvi, hia nigawesgvi

17:3
3 Get thee hence, and turn thee eastward, and hide thyself by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
3 ᎠᏂ ᎭᏓᏅᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎧᎸᎩ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏫᎿᏛᏁᏓ, ᎠᎴ ᏩᏗᏍᎦᎸᎦ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
3 ani hadanvna, ale dikalvgi iditlv wihnadvneda, ale wadisgalvga usdi uweyv tsilidi nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.

17:4
4 And it shall be, that thou shalt drink of the brook; and I have commanded the ravens to feed thee there.
4  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏕᏍᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᎭᏗᏔᏍᎨᏍᏗ; ᎠᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎨᏤᎳᏍᏗ ᎦᏥᎾᏬᏍᏔᏅ ᎪᎳᏅ.
4  ale nasgi nusdesdi, nasgi usdi uweyv haditasgesdi; ala nahna getselasdi gatsinawostanv golanv.

17:5
5 So he went and did according unto the word of the Lord: for he went and dwelt by the brook Cherith, that is before Jordan.
5 ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏐᏩ ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏱᎰᏩ ᎤᏁᏨ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᏄᏛᏁᎴᎢ, ᎤᏪᏅᏎ ᏰᏃ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏪᏴ ᏥᎵᏗ ᎾᎥ ᎤᏕᏁᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏓᏂ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᎩ.
5 nasgino sowa uwenvse yihowa unetsv nasgiya nudvnelei, uwenvse yeno ale usdi uweyv tsilidi nav udenei, nasgi tsodani igvyiditlv tsigi.

17:6
6 And the ravens brought him bread and flesh in the morning, and bread and flesh in the evening; and he drank of the brook.
6 ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏑᎾᎴ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᎧᏯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏩᏲᎮᎮ ᎪᎳᏅ, ᎤᏒᏃ  ᎦᏚ ᎠᎴ ᎭᏫᏯ;  ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎨᏴ ᎠᏗᏔᏍᎨᎢ.
6 ale nasgi sunale gesv gadu ale hakaya nasgi gvwayohehe golanv, usvno  gadu ale hawiya;  ale nasgi usdi geyv aditasgei.


7 And it came to pass after a while, that the brook dried up, because there had been no rain in the land.
7  ᎢᎸᏍᎩᏃ ᏫᏄᏬᎯᏨ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᎴ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏬᏲᏐᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎨᏴᎢ, ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎨ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᏒ ᏄᎦᎿᏅᏫ ᎨᏒᎢ.
7  ilvsgino winuwohitsv nasgi nulistanile, nasgi uwoyosone nahna usdi geyvi, nvdigalisdodisge nahna ayeli gesv nugahnanvwi gesvi.

8 And the word of the Lord came unto him, saying,
8 ᎠᎴ ᎤᎷᏤᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎰᏩ ᏬᏁᎬ, ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏪᏍᎬᎢ.
8 ale ulutsele nasgi yihowa wonegv, hia nigawesgvi.

9 Arise, get thee to Zarephath, which belongeth to Zidon, and dwell there: behold, I have commanded a widow woman there to sustain thee.
9 ᏔᎵᎲᎦ, ᏥᎵᏆᏗ ᏫᎶᎯ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏙᏂ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎪᎯ ᏥᎩ, ᎠᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎭᏕᎲᎦ:  ᎬᏂᏳᏉ ᏥᏁᏤᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏬᏑᎶᏨᎯ ᎠᎨᏴ ᏣᏍᏆᏂᎪᏙᏗᏱ.
9 talihvga, tsiliquadi wilohi, nasgi sadoni unatseligohi tsigi, ala nahna hadehvga:  gvniyuquo tsinetselv nahna uwosulotsvhi ageyv tsasquanigododiyi.

10 So he arose and went to Zarephath. And when he came to the gate of the city, behold, the widow woman was there gathering of sticks: and he called to her, and said, Fetch me, I pray thee, a little water in a vessel, that I may drink.
10  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏚᎴᏁ ᏥᎵᏆᏗ ᏭᏣᏎᎢ.  ᎾᏉᏃ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᏍᏚᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᎷᏣ, ᎬᏂᏨᏉ ᎾᎿ ᎡᏙᎮ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏬᏑᎶᏨᎯ ᎠᎨᏴ ᎦᎾᏍᏓ ᏚᎫᏘᏍᎨᎢ.  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎵᏍᏗᏁᎴᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᏄᏪᏎᎢ, ᎡᏍᎩᏁᏦᎯᏏ ᏊᎦᎭ, ᎤᏍᏗ ᎠᎹ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᏗᏔᏍᏗᏱ.
10  nasgino dulene tsiliquadi wutsasei.  naquono gaduhv asduisdi ulutsa, gvnitsvquo nahna edohe nasgi uwosulotsvhi ageyv ganasda dugutisgei.  nasgino ulisdinelei, hia nuwesei, esginetsohisi quugaha, usdi ama nasgi aquaditasdiyi.

11 And as she was going to fetch it, he called to her, and said, Bring me, I pray thee, a morsel of bread in thine hand.
11  ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎦᏁᎩᏎᎬ, ᎢᎤᎵᏍᏔᏁᎴᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏬᏎᎢ; ᏍᎩᏲᎮᎸ ᏇᎦᎭ ᏏᏅᏍᎦᎶᏗ ᎢᎦᎢ ᎦᏚ ᏣᏒᎦᎴᏍᏗᏉ.
11  nasgino aisv ganegisegv, iulistanelei, ale hia nuwosei; sgiyohelv quegaha sinvsgalodi igai gadu tsasvgalesdiquo.

12 And she said, As the Lord thy God liveth, I have not a cake, but an handful of meal in a barrel, and a little oil in a cruse: and, behold, I am gathering two sticks, that I may go in and dress it for me and my son, that we may eat it, and die.
12  ᎯᎠᏃ ᏅᏧᏬᏎᎢ, ᏥᏄᏙᎯᏳᎭ ᏱᎰᏩ ᏣᏁᎳᏅᎯ ᎡᎲ Ꮭ ᏌᏉᏅᎾ ᎦᏚ ᏯᎩᎭ, ᏏᏂᎦᏙᎵᏉ ᏍᎩᏂ ᎢᎦᎢ ᎢᏒ.
12  hiano nvtsuwosei, tsinudohiyuha yihowa tsanelanvhi ehv tla saquonvna gadu yagiha, sinigadoliquo sgini igai isv.


~~~~~~~

13 And Elijah said unto her, Fear not; go and do as thou hast said: but make me thereof a little cake first, and bring it unto me, and after make for thee and for thy son.
14 For thus saith the Lord God of Israel, The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail, until the day that the Lord sendeth rain upon the earth.
15 And she went and did according to the saying of Elijah: and she, and he, and her house, did eat many days.
16 And the barrel of meal wasted not, neither did the cruse of oil fail, according to the word of the Lord, which he spake by Elijah.
17 And it came to pass after these things, that the son of the woman, the mistress of the house, fell sick; and his sickness was so sore, that there was no breath left in him.
18 And she said unto Elijah, What have I to do with thee, O thou man of God? art thou come unto me to call my sin to remembrance, and to slay my son?
19 And he said unto her, Give me thy son. And he took him out of her bosom, and carried him up into a loft, where he abode, and laid him upon his own bed.
20 And he cried unto the Lord, and said, O Lord my God, hast thou also brought evil upon the widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son?
21 And he stretched himself upon the child three times, and cried unto the Lord, and said, O Lord my God, I pray thee, let this child's soul come into him again.
22 And the Lord heard the voice of Elijah; and the soul of the child came into him again, and he revived.
23 And Elijah took the child, and brought him down out of the chamber into the house, and delivered him unto his mother: and Elijah said, See, thy son liveth.
24 And the woman said to Elijah, Now by this I know that thou art a man of God, and that the word of the Lord in thy mouth is truth.
King James Version (KJV)
by Public Domain


Cherokee Translation by A. N. Chamberlain, 1888
PUBLIC DOMAIN

Friday, July 15, 2016


Language


The Cherokee language is similar in some ways to the Iroquois family of languages. 

Each word can convey the meaning of an entire sentence.


WHOLE SENTENCES IN A SINGLE WORD

Cherokee is similar in some ways to the Iroquois family of languages, causing some to group it with them.  Others have demonstrated that Cherokee is distinctive enough to not fit in any other category and to stand alone among languages. 

Cherokee is a 'polysynthetic' language, which means that words are formed with a root, one or more affixes (always has a prefix) and a suffix.

A Cherokee word can thus be very long and can mean what actually corresponds to an entire sentence in other languages.

So get over thinking that you are learning words.  
You are actually learning sentences!

Each community will have its own unique way of saying a sentence and that sentence becomes the agreed upon meaning of a word.
Other communities may understand the "word-sentence" but they may not use the same "word-sentence" when speaking.

DIFFERENT DIALECTS

Historically, the Cherokee homeland covered the entire southeastern portion of the present day United States.  As the people were forced to live closer and closer to one another, and as entire populations of communities died from disease and refugee camp level living conditions, the dialects were forced to interact more closely with one another and some shifts occurred.  

Researchers such as the Kilpatrick's and many others were convinced that there were historically many more dialects than just the few that ethnologists like Mooney came up with, and today there are some communities that still have their own distinctive ways of speaking, but by and large, the different dialects you may hear today include these:

Oklahoma- often called the "western dialect" and it has the most speakers.
Robbinsville or "Snowbird"- sometimes called the "eastern dialect"  Western and Snowbird share more similarities with each other than all other eastern dialects do.  It has the 2nd most speakers of all the other dialects.
Yellowhill- which also claims the title of "eastern dialect".  Yellowhill and Snowbird have some similarities.
Big Cove- which is sometimes also referred to with the title of "eastern dialect" which actually has two variations of dialect, one which NEVER uses one entire line of syllabary, and another which uses the entire syllabary.

CHEROKEE LOAN WORDS

There are no cognates between English and Cherokee, however, there are some "borrowed" words that have come into use such as the word for watch "Wah chee" from the English and "Wa ga" from the Spanish for Cow (Vaca).When a word is "Borrowed" the last syllable of that word is always a rising tone.




A DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE



Every word in Cherokee is a sentence.  Each "word-sentence" that is very descriptive.

The word for "Wa-Ya" which is universally recognized to also mean "wolf" is a sentence which states "He is carrying the long rigid item".

As is the case for all languages, Cherokee continues to evolve, and when loan words are not used, new, highly descriptive words are created.

Cherokee is a very literal language.
For example, past additions to the lexicon include “computer,” which translates literally in English to “the thing that makes you lazy.”


As another example, Cherokee word for “attorney,” which is “didiyohihi.” The literal translation of “didiyohihi” is “s/he/it argues repeatedly and on purpose with a purpose.” 

The polysynthetic nature of the Cherokee language enables the language to develop new descriptive words in Cherokee to reflect or express new concepts.

One final example here is ᏗᏓᏂᏱᏍᎩ (didaniyisgi) which means "the final catcher" or "s/he/it catches them finally and conclusively." This is the Cherokee word for "policeman."
The written language and pronunciation are something else again and can be read about in several of the books on the language that are available, however nothing is as helpful as actually HEARING it spoken.

That is true with other languages as well, however, in Cherokee, it is even more important because


CHEROKEE IS A TONAL LANGUAGE.


In a tone language (tonal language), different tones (like in music, but not as many) will change the meaning of the words, even if the pronunciation of the word is the same otherwise. English and almost all other European languages are not tone languages at all.

This really complicates things for those who either learned English First or learned the languages together (bilingually) and some fluent speakers have commented that the bilingual folks never really seem to get the tone correct.

One of the best ways to indicate tone is to write out each word on a music staff in musical notation.  This helps more folks to start to get it right.





NOTE:  Cherokee Counts the Days of the Week from Monday through Sunday
(like most of the rest of the world, including Spain)




WHAT TO DO IF YOU WANT TO LEARN


If you want to learn the language you need to commit yourself to spending TIME to learn it.

TIME studying it.

TIME listening to it.

TIME speaking it either into a recording of yourself (Audadicity is free for your pc) or speaking to others.

If you commit yourself to AT LEAST two (2) hours per day for 6 days per week and AT LEAST one day per week for at least EIGHT (8) Hours (taking regular breaks like you would do for work)
doing the 3 things listed above (Studying, listening, speaking) 

then

You will have used your time well to fulfill the necessary 5,000+ hours that it takes to learn this language.

DON'T LET THIS SCARE YOU OFF!

What will you do?

Will you START NOW and look back 5 years from now and be GLAD you did?!
OR

Will you put it off and look back 5 years from now and WISH you had started?

The CHOICE IS YOURS!






Friday, July 08, 2016

Stop using English for SOUNDS- sound swap!

A super quick way to start speaking Cherokee and to start grasping the mindset of the language is to start replacing your English (or primary language) with Cherokee words and sounds.

Ever needed a "jump start" on your car or truck?

Well, onomatopoeia's can become a "jump start" for your language!

ONOMATOPOEIA

What's an onomatopoeia?  

It is a poetic way of describing a sound or can identify an animal or object with a sound.




The Greeks coined the word and the Latin borrowed it.  Our English is Latin based.

Story tellers and Poets often use onomatopoeia to access the reader’s auditory sense and create rich soundscapes.

My friend tells me that Onomatopoeia could be called (in the Cherokee Language) ᎤᏃᏴᎬ ᎠᏰᎵᏍᎩ “'unoyvgv ayelisgi' (sound imitator or sound mocker).” [Source: Dr. Durbin Feeling]

We have an entire unit theme on ONOMATOPOEIA's we have collected from various sources including old documents, books, and even speakers who were willing to share with us.

Its a bit much for a blog post so we won't post it all here 
BUT

we will give you a FEW just to get you jump started!

Remember, this is NOT a complete list of all the Cherokee onomatopoeia's (ᎤᏃᏴᎬ ᎠᏰᎵᏍᎩ) but it is a BEGINNING LIST.

Start using these in everyday life first.


Here we go!


What it describes   English Version      Cherokee 
                                                              Syllabary
                                                               & phonetic

Dog Barking                bow wow! woof! woof!                     Ꮧ! Ꮧ!  [di:!  di:!]

[note:  I think of "yip!" when I hear this]

Rooster Crow           cock-a-doodle-doo!         Ꭷ   ka-   ᎯᏰᎩ! /ᎢᏥᏰᎩ     [hiyegi! /itsiyegi]

clapping sound                   clap! clap!  clap!                     Ꮪ! Ꮪ! Ꮪ!   [du;! du:! du:!]

crow cawing                         caw, caw!                                    Ꭺ Ꭶ    [gho:ga!]

lightning                  flash (or zoom!)                   ᏌᏱ, ᏓᎻ!  [sa:yi!  da mi!]

thunder                                    crack!  boom!                               ᎯᎾᏚ  [hi:nadu:!]

footsteps approaching clop, clop, clop! E, E, E! [GV:! GV:! Gv:!]
(also, Drum sounds!) pa rum pa pum pum E, E,E, E, E!


REMEMBER

there are many MORE of these

but you can START right now by replacing your everyday English sounds with these CHEROKEE sounds instead!
Especially when you are telling BEDTIME STORIES to your children!

have FUN!

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Yonagusga's Decree: Vocabulary List

As requested:




ᏎᏍᏗ 

ᏣᏒᏂᎸᎩ


ᏣᏒᏂᎸᎩᎩᎥ


ᎤᏁᎳᎩ

ᎾᏍᎩ

ᎤᎵᏍᏈᏗ

ᎤᏁᎳᎩ

ᎤᏁᎳᎩᎥ

ᎤᏂᏣᏔᏅ

ᎯᏰᏃᏚᎸ

ᏄᎾᏰᎯᏍᏛᎾ

ᎠᏁᎵᏍᎬᎩ

ᎬᏂᎾᎿ

ᎤᎾᏚᏓᎸᏅ

ᎯᏫᏅ

ᏣᏚᎩᏒᎩ

ᎢᎾᏛ

ᎢᎬᏩᎾᏰᎯᏍᏗ

ᎤᏍᎦᏎᏗᏳᏳᏓᏍᎦᎶᏨ

ᎤᏣᏘ

ᎮᏯᏔᎮᏍᏗ

ᏔᏓᏅᏛᎵ

ᏥᏂᎸᏃᏔᏅᎯ

ᏔᏓᏅᏛᎵ

ᏧᏂᎸᏬᎠᏒᎯ

ᏗᎨᎦᏛᏅᎯ

Friday, February 19, 2016

Don't Touch it!

The Story Behind the SONG
===========
PRIMARY SOURCES:
Myths of the Cherokee, by James Mooney
and
WCU Archives
==========
Yonaguska, (1759–1839), who was known as Drowning Bear (the English meaning of his name), was a leader among the Cherokee of the Lower Towns of North Carolina. As a result of a vision, in 1819 he banished liquor from his people's territory.
Yonaguska, or Drowning-bear [Mooney wrote it in the Phonetics of the time as Yâ′na-gûñ′skĭ, today we might write it as YOH- NAH- GOOSE-GAH] “Bear-drowning-him”), the acknowledged chief of all the Cherokee then living on the waters of Tuckasegee and Oconaluftee—the old Kituhwa country. On learning that the boy Will Thomas had neither father nor brother, the old chief formally adopted him as his son, and as such he was thenceforth recognized in the tribe under the name of Wil-Usdi′, or “Little Will,” he being of small stature even in mature age. From his Indian friends, particularly a boy of the same age who was his companion in the store, he learned the language as well as a white man has ever learned it, so that in his declining years it dwelt in memory more strongly than his mother tongue.


[Will Thomas suffered from dementia in his later years, forgetting how to speak English, and only speaking/understanding Cherokee Language]


 After the invention of the Cherokee alphabet, Will learned also to read and write the language.
During the Indian Removal of the late 1830s, Yonagusga (Bear, He is Drowning) was the only chief who remained in the hills to rebuild the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, joined by others who had escaped or eluded the United States soldiers. Before that time, he had adopted William Holland Thomas as his son; the fatherless European-American youth was working at the trading post and had learned Cherokee. Yonaguska taught him Cherokee ways and, after Thomas became an attorney, he represented the tribe in negotiations with the federal government. Yonaguska selected Thomas as his successor; he was the only white man ever to become a chief of a Cherokee band. Thomas bought land and established a Cherokee reserve for the tribe's use at what is now the Qualla Boundary, the territory of the federally recognized tribe in North Carolina.
Yonaguska was born about 1759 in the Cherokee Lower Towns of present-day North Carolina and Georgia. According to the Cherokee matrilineal system of inheritance and descent, he was considered born into his Cherokee mother's clan, where he gained his status. As a boy of 12, Yonaguska had a vision that the European Americans threatened the Cherokee way of life, but people did not pay attention when he spoke of it. At age 17, he witnessed widespread destruction by Gen. Griffith Rutherford and his North Carolina militia, who in 1776 burned 36 Cherokee towns. The Cherokee had been allied with the British, and the colonials were trying to discourage them from acting in the coming revolution.
Yonaguska was described as a strikingly handsome man, strongly built, and standing 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m).
He suffered from becoming addicted to alcohol as a young man.
He and his wife adopted as their son William Holland Thomas, a fatherless European-American youth who worked at the trading post at Qualla Town and learned the Cherokee language.
Thomas learned many Cherokee ways.
In 1819 when he was 60 years old, Yonaguska became critically ill.


He was pronounced dead by his people. 


It was only after he RECOVERED that this was described as a TRANCE.


While either DEAD or in a TRANCE, [you decide which you believe]


Yonagusga had a vision of the Creator speaking to him, which he told his people after recovering.
His message from the spirit world was that,


“The Cherokee must never again drink alcohol. Alcohol must be banished.”


The people were amazed by what they saw as a RESURRECTION and listened carefully.


Yonagusga  had Will Thomas write out a pledge:


“The undersigned Cherokees, belonging to the town of Qualla agree to abandon the use of spirituous liquors.”


Yonaguska signed it, followed by the council (chiefs of the clans) and town residents.


Mooney wrote that this was Preserved among Thomas’ papers, the pledge is held in the archives of the Mountain Heritage Center at Western Carolina University.


[NOTE:  recent efforts to view the original of this pledge revealed that only a copy remains and the original has recently mysteriously "disappeared";  some speculate that it was illegally removed recently and sold to a private collector]


From the signing of the pledge until Yonaguska's death in 1839 at the age of 80, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians refrained from using liquor.




On the few occasions when he learned of someone breaking the pledge, Yonaguska had the culprit whipped.
Throughout the early 19th century, federal agents tried to persuade Yonaguska to remove his people to lands west of the Mississippi River.


He firmly resisted their efforts, declaring that the Cherokee were safer among their rocks and mountains, and belonged in their ancestral homeland.


Other chiefs made the Treaty of 1819, by which they sold Cherokee lands along the Tuckasegee River.


At the time, Yonaguska was given 640 acres (2.6 km2) set aside in a bend of the river between Ela and Bryson City, including the ancient Mississippian culture site of Kituwa, which the Cherokee held sacred.





During his life, Yonaguska was a reformer and a prophet; he was a leader who recognized the destructive power of the white man’s liquor and the settlers' insatiable greed for Cherokee lands.
As pressure increased by the federal government for removal of Indians from the Southeast, Yonaguska rejected every offer for land exchange and subsidies.


Having seen European-American settlers push westward through North Carolina, he did not believe they would ever be satisfied. He did not want to leave his homeland and face more removal pressure later. He thought the United States government promises of protection were "too often broken; they are like the reeds in yonder river—they are all lies.”


Shortly before his death in April 1839, Yonaguska was carried into the town house at Soco, where he gave a last talk to his people. The old man commended Thomas to them as their chief and warned them against ever leaving their own country. Wrapping his blanket around him, he quietly lay back and died.
Yonaguska was buried beside Soco Creek, about a mile below the old Macedonia mission, with a mound of stones to mark the spot.


TUNES
Folk Song (Public Domain) [this is the one I recorded


It has
also been sung [in different arrangement than above] to the tunes of

-- Leaning on the Everlasting arms
and even
-- Seal's "Kissed by a Rose from a Grave"


Here is our recording of it (acapella, does anyone want to help us get the music recorded for it?)




THE SONG- sounds BEST sung "all together" WITHOUT the "pauses" we put in this one so you can see the "breaks" for learning it.


Once you learn it, sing it without all the "pauses" between the choruses and verses.








LISTEN TO IT HERE
https://youtu.be/5GUrf89vhEU


TRANSLATION IS BELOW:


========
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
===========
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮔ Ꮎ Ᏸ Ꭿ Ꮝ Ꮫ Ꮎ Ꭰ Ꮑ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꭼ Ꭹ
Ꭼ Ꮒ Ꮎ Ꮏ Ꭴ Ꮎ Ꮪ Ꮣ Ꮈ Ꮕ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꭿ Ꮻ Ꮕ Ꮳ Ꮪ Ꭹ Ꮢ-- Ꭹ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
===========
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ

==============
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭲ Ꮎ Ꮫ Ꭲ Ꭼ Ꮹ Ꮎ Ᏸ Ꭿ Ꮝ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮝ Ꭶ Ꮞ Ꮧ Ᏻ Ᏻ Ꮣ Ꮝ Ꭶ Ꮆ Ꮸ
Ꭴ Ꮳ Ꮨ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭾ Ꮿ Ꮤ Ꭾ Ꮝ Ꮧ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
=================
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
=============
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮤ Ꮣ Ꮕ Ꮫ Ꮅ
Ꮵ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꮓ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ
Ꮤ Ꮣ Ꮕ Ꮫ Ꮅ
Ꮷ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꮼ Ꭰ Ꮢ Ꭿ
Ꮤ Ꮣ Ꮕ Ꮫ Ꮅ
Ꮧ Ꭸ Ꭶ Ꮫ Ꮕ Ꭿ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
===================
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
============
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꮎ Ꮝ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮅ Ꮝ Ꮘ Ꮧ
Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭴ Ꮑ Ꮃ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꭴ Ꮒ Ꮳ Ꮤ Ꮕ Ꭿ Ᏸ Ꮓ Ꮪ Ꮈ
Ꮞ Ꮝ Ꮧ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ
Ꮞ ᏍᏗ Ꮳ Ꮢ Ꮒ Ꮈ Ꭹ Ꭹ Ꭵ



===============




CHORUS
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
u ne la gi na s gi u li s qui di
u ne la gi u ne la gi v
u ni tsa ta nv hi ye no du lv
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v


VERSE 1


se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
nu na ye hi s dv na a ne li s gv gi
gv ni na hna u na du da lv nv
se s di hi wi nv tsa du gi sv-- gi
se s di se s di tsa sv ni lv gi
se s di se s di tsa sv ni lv gi
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v


CHORUS


se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
u ne la gi na s gi u li s qui di
u ne la gi u ne la gi v
u ni tsa ta nv hi ye no du lv
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v


VERSE 2




se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
i na dv i gv wa na ye hi s di
u s ga se di yu yu da s ga lo tsv
u tsa ti na s gi he ya ta he s di
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v



CHORUS




se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
u ne la gi na s gi u li s qui di
u ne la gi u ne la gi v
u ni tsa ta nv hi ye no du lv
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
---



VERSE 3



se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
ta da nv dv li
tsi ni lv no ta n(v) hi
ta da nv dv li
tsu n(i) lv wo a sv hi
ta da nv dv li
di ge ga dv nv hi
se s di se s di tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v




CHORUS




se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
u ne la gi na s gi u li s qui di
u ne la gi u ne la gi v
u ni tsa ta nv hi ye no du lv
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v



REPEAT CHORUS

se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
u ne la gi na s gi u li s qui di
u ne la gi u ne la gi v
u ni tsa ta nv hi ye no du lv
se s di tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v
se sdi tsa sv ni lv gi gi v


TRANSLATION is difficult because the words in Cherokee convey more meaning than will fit in English, but here is the basic




MEANING OF THE WORDS



Don't Touch it!
Leave it alone because it is almost over
Leave it alone!
Don't Touch it!
It has killed many people
They realized afterwards that it was dangerous
Obviously it addicts them
Young Man
Don't drink Alcohol
Don't Even Touch it!


Don't Touch it!
Leave it alone because it is almost over
Leave it alone!
Don't Touch it!
You will be given something and it will appear as something beautiful
but Don't Touch it!
Like a snake, it too is dangerous
So be alert!
Don't Even touch it!

Don't Touch it!
Leave it alone because it is almost over
Leave it alone!
Don't Touch it!
Think about all those who died from it
Don't even touch it!
Remember those whom it drove insane!
Remember those who passed on from it
Think about those who committed crimes & were hung because of it
Don't even touch it!

Don't Touch it!
Leave it alone because it is almost over
Leave it alone!
Don't Even Touch it!


=====


James Mooney wrote: "The facts concerning Yonaguska are based on the author’s personal information obtained from Colonel Thomas, supplemented from conversations with old Indians. The date of his death and his approximate age are taken from the Terrell roll.
Yonaguska is also noticed at length in Lanman’s Letters from the Alleghany Mountains, 1848, and in Zeigler and Grosscup’s Heart of the Alleghanies, 1883. "


DIALECT NOTE:
ᏎᏍᏗ or "shayz dee" is the EASTERN (Kituwah)  Dialect.


I have heard the WESTERN DIALECT say this/ sing this as


ᏞᏍᏗ




Sunday, January 31, 2016

Pronunciation Reminder

When Speaking




RULE: When a “borrowed” language word is used, the final syllable will always be one of the -i- syllables from the 3rd column (e.g. suffixes of -Ꭲ, -Ꭹ, -Ꭿ, -Ꮅ, -Ꮋ, -Ꮒ, -Ꮘ, -Ꮟ, -Ꮧ, -Ꮨ, -Ꮯ, -Ꮵ, -Ꮻ, -Ᏹ ) of the Syllabary Chart as arranged by Worcester, and will always have a rising upward or high tonal sound/pitch.


[Source: Anna Gritts Kilpatrick Smith; Cherokee EBCI Elder Walker Calhoun]

When speaking or when writing:


Adding the final suffix of "-Ꭲ" to a common noun such as the name of a color or a number indicates that the speaker wants the listener to understand this is not the generic name of the item but is a specific item in proximity to the speaker that s/he wants us to recognize.

It also differentiates the name of a common noun to that of a proper noun, such as when a person is named "RED". 

For example, the color red is simply ᎩᎦᎨ, but to call a person RED would be to say ᎩᎦᎨᎢ.


The same is true with numbers and many other common nouns.


SOURCE:  Anna Gritts Kilpatrick Smith; Cherokee EBCI Elder Walker Calhoun, Harry Oosahwee

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Respecting your Elders where it counts

In the winter months, when temperatures plummet, we are reminded to care for our elders.


But we shouldn't just check in on them when the weather is bad.


We need to truly respect and honor them.


The question rises from time to time:  how do we do that correctly?


Years ago, when I first began meeting regularly with a few elders for the purpose of practicing speaking, I was confounded by a such a quandary.




The elder obviously was spending a great deal of time with me and helping me, but how could I repay them? 


They would not tell me what they would appreciate, but I knew that just giving groceries and gifts was not adequate reimbursement for their time.




So I spoke with lots of folks and came up with a plan that the elders (seemed to) appreciate and that I could live with myself.




I continued to give gifts of course, purchasing groceries and household supplies, items I knew they could use in their craft making, and even making gifts for them myself using my own skills.


But I also checked around and found out what tutors and piano teachers were charging in our area.


I took the high and the low charges and averaged them out.  I kept track of the hours of direct contact the elder would spend with me.




I then would put this in an envelope and would give it to the elder when I dropped off my usual gifts.


Folks, this was a practical solution and I never had an elder turn this down. 


You can of course, offer those who are teaching you your language more than this, but I found this "rule of thumb" helpful in keeping me accountable and on track with my lessons.


It was also something I could calculate into my household budget.




If you are interested in developing your own average to share with an elder, check out this blog on piano lesson costs per each half hour around the country:  http://takelessons.com/blog/how-much-are-piano-lessons




You can also check your local newspaper and colleges and find out what tutors and music teachers charge in your community.




Respecting your elders seems rather vague but putting it into this context helps to understand what is a fair and equitable way to care for those who are giving you this precious gift.




Remember, this is a starting point;  you should also give as much as you can to help your elder by sharing items where appropriate (in addition to giving money) such as firewood, groceries, yard work, household items, clothing and other ways of showing your love and gratitude.


Don't just wait for your elder's birthday or Christmas either, but of course, you should also give something on those occasions.




Our elders would never ask this from us, but they would have every right to demand it.  If we truly want to honor our elders, we must be willing to do more than just say nice things about them and "thank you" without anything to back it up is just a nice sounding phrase to soothe our own conscience but it does nothing to help our elders, many of whom are on a very small fixed income.


SGI for listening!

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Intro to Conjunctions

An introduction to Cherokee Conjunctions
In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, sentences, phrases, or clauses found in the English [Yigilisi] language.


This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for different languages.


In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction.


The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that".

Here is a list of
Cherokee Conjunctions
and their English  [Yigilisi]


Counterparts that you may find helpful:

And / &


ᎠᎴ / ᏃᎴ

ᎠᎴ (western dialect)
-----
ᏃᎴ
 (eastern dialect)
====
but/yet
ᎠᏎᏃ
====
For
ᎾᏍᎩ
=====
Nor/ or
ᏙᎨ (prounced with hard "g" sound approaching "k"
(a negative is found elsewhere in the sentence in the case of "nor")
====
So
ᎾᏍᏉᎴ


NOTE:  while some may use these differently, the 3 elders I discussed this with all affirmed that this is the more correct/ more precise way of using these conjunctions.

PURPLE- different names for PURPLE

I tore a muscle in my arm a few months ago and while its healing I have to rest it.
I found someone to help me post this. 
Once I am better, I will post more often.


Voice recognition programs do not seem to work with Cherokee language ... yet...


PURPLE-- different names for PURPLE




why different words?

has more to do with than just the HUE it also relates to the kind

ᏕᎷᎨᎢ de-lu-ge-i
purple colored flowers such as the thistle [ ᏥᏥ ]blossom


or

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ u-we-ti-ge-i

 purple colored plants; describes edible vegetables like purple onions and purple potatoes BUT also describes inedible mushrooms

purple topped mushrooms
purple potatoes


ᏕᎷᎨᎢ purple colored flowers are transitory items;

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ purple colored plants means the item itself is saturated with that color- the stems, stalks, tubers and even the fruit.

Purple Cabbage



SENTENCES TO STUDY

"The Cherokee did NOT eat the purple mushroom"

ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏍᏗᏱ ᏓᏂᏯᎩᏍᎨ ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ ᏓᏬᎵ

======


"Plants purple they are blooming"



ᏕᎦᎪᏗ ᏕᎷᎨᎢ ᎠᏂᏥᎸᏍᎦ

========

"Scottish Thistle has a purple blossom"

ᎠᏍᎦᏥ ᏥᏥ ᎤᏰᎬᎢ ᏕᎷᎨᎢ ᎤᏥᎸᎰᎢ

=======

"s/he used a purple onion in her/his cooking"

ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ ᏒᎩ ᎬᏗ ᏍᎬᎩ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬᎢ

===




NOTE: ᏕᎷᎨᎢ is also used to describe bruises because they are transitory; ᎤᏪᏘᎨᎢ is used for age spots because they become permanent; this also has overtones/nuances of age, maturity and fruition.



Tuesday, October 20, 2015

afraid part 1

ᎯᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ / hi-s-ga-i-he-s-di (you) Be afraid! (Imperative, singular, first person bound pronoun)


ᏥᏍᎦᎢᎭ /tsi-s-ga-i-ha/ I am afraid (present tense, singular, first person bound pronoun)


ᏥᏍᎦᎢᎲᎩ /tsi-s-ga-i-hv-gi/ I was afraid (singular, first person bound pronoun, past tense)


Don't be Afraid! (imperative, singular, first person bound pronoun) ᎨᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ/gesdi yisgaihesdi/




extra:  singular, imperative, western dialect:  ᏞᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /Tle-s-di yi-s-ga-i-he-s-di/


extra:  (don't be afraid, plural)
one of the plural forms would be:

Eastern: ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏱᏍᏗᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /gesesdi yisdisgaihesdi/

Western:
ᏞᏍᏗ ᏂᎯ ᏱᏍᏗᏍᎦᎢᎮᏍᏗ /Tle-s-di ni-hi yi-s-di-s-ga-i-he-s-di/

Friday, October 16, 2015

Moms & Dads

you asked for more---- hia--




you asked for

ᎯᎠ ᎠᎩᏘᏏ ᏃᎴ ᎠᎩᏙᏓ
hia agitisi nole agidoda


THIS IS MY MOM AND DAD


a great way to introduce your parents to someone else!


now, are you ready for more?


===
is this my mom & dad?
ᎯᎠᏍᎪ ᎠᎩᏥ ᏃᎴ ᎠᎩᏙᏓ?
hiasgo agitsi nole agidoda?
ᎯᎠᏍᎪ ᏣᏥ ᏃᎴ ᏣᏙᏓ?
is this your mom & dad?
hiasgo tsatsi nole tsadoda?
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — your mom
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — your dad
ᎠᎩᏥ - agi-tsi  my mother
ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agidoda) — my dad
place the following in the form of a question if you are asking instead of stating

ᎯᏙᏓ (hitsi) — you are his/her mom
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahitsi) — you are their mom


MOMMY WORDS


ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agitsi) — my mom
ᎩᏂᏙᏓ (ginitsi) — mom of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏙᏓ (oginitsi) — mom of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏙᏓ (igitsi) — our mom (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏙᏓ (ogitsi) — our mom (excluding you)
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — your mom
ᏍᏗᏙᏓ (sditsi) — mom of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏙᏓ (itsitsi) — your mom (three or more)
ᎤᏙᏓ (utsi) — his/her mom
ᎤᏂᏙᏓ (unitsi) — their mom
ᎬᏙᏓ (gvtsi) — I am your mom
ᏍᏛᏙᏓ (sdvtsi) — I am your mom (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏙᏓ (itsvtsi) — I am your mom (three or more)
ᏥᏙᏓ (tsitsi) — I am his/her mom
ᎦᏥᏙᏓ (gatsitsi) — I am their mom
ᏍᎩᏙᏓ (sgitsi) — you are my mom
ᏍᎩᏂᏙᏓ (sginitsi) — you are our mom (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏙᏓ (isgitsi) — you are our mom (three or more)
ᎯᏙᏓ (hitsi) — you are his/her mom
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahitsi) — you are their mom
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsatsi) — she is your mom



DADDY WORDS



ᎠᎩᏙᏓ (agidoda) — my dad
ᎩᏂᏙᏓ (ginidoda) — dad of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏙᏓ (oginidoda) — dad of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏙᏓ (igidoda) — our dad (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏙᏓ (ogidoda) — our dad (excluding you)
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — your dad
ᏍᏗᏙᏓ (sdidoda) — dad of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏙᏓ (itsidoda) — your dad (three or more)
ᎤᏙᏓ (udoda) — his/her dad
ᎤᏂᏙᏓ (unidoda) — their dad
ᎬᏙᏓ (gvdoda) — I am your dad
ᏍᏛᏙᏓ (sdvdoda) — I am your dad (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏙᏓ (itsvdoda) — I am your dad (three or more)
ᏥᏙᏓ (tsidoda) — I am his/her dad
ᎦᏥᏙᏓ (gatsidoda) — I am their dad
ᏍᎩᏙᏓ (sgidoda) — you are my dad
ᏍᎩᏂᏙᏓ (sginidoda) — you are our dad (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏙᏓ (isgidoda) — you are our dad (three or more)
ᎯᏙᏓ (hidoda) — you are his/her dad
ᎦᎯᏙᏓ (gahidoda) — you are their dad
ᏣᏙᏓ (tsadoda) — he is your dad


===========
EXTRA:

ᎠᎩᏓᏅᏟ (agidanvtli) — my brother
ᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (ginidanvtli) — brother of us two
ᎣᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (oginidanvtli) — brother of me and one other (but not you)
ᎢᎩᏓᏅᏟ (igidanvtli) — our brother (three or more)
ᎣᎩᏓᏅᏟ (ogidanvtli) — our brother (excluding you)
ᏣᏓᏅᏟ (tsadanvtli) — your brother
ᏍᏗᏓᏅᏟ (sdidanvtli) — brother of the two of you
ᎢᏥᏓᏅᏟ (itsidanvtli) — your brother (three or more)
ᎤᏓᏅᏟ (udanvtli) — his/her brother
ᎤᏂᏓᏅᏟ (unidanvtli) — their brother
ᎬᏓᏅᏟ (gvdanvtli) — I am your brother
ᏍᏛᏓᏅᏟ (sdvdanvtli) — I am your brother (of the two of you)
ᎢᏨᏓᏅᏟ (itsvdanvtli) — I am your brother (three or more)
ᏥᏓᏅᏟ (tsidanvtli) — I am his/her brother
ᎦᏥᏓᏅᏟ (gatsidanvtli) — I am their brother
ᏍᎩᏓᏅᏟ (sgidanvtli) — you are my brother
ᏍᎩᏂᏓᏅᏟ (sginidanvtli) — you are our brother (of us two)
ᎢᏍᎩᏓᏅᏟ (isgidanvtli) — you are our brother (three or more)
ᎢᏓᎵᏅᏟ / ᎯᏓᏅᏟ (hidanvtli) — you are his/her brother (dialectical difference)
ᎦᎯᏓᏅᏟ (gahidanvtli) — you are their brother
ᏣᏓᏅᏟ (tsadanvtli) — he is your brother
ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏟ (anadanvtli) -our brother (everyone's brother, including me and him)